5 Organizations Doing Live Streaming Right

5 Organizations Doing Live Streaming Right

2017 is poised to be the year of live streaming, according to Social Media Today.

Lately, so many brands are finding creative ways to incorporate live streaming into their marketing strategies—and we can all learn a thing or two from them. In hopes of sparking some inspiration, we gathered some of the more intriguing use cases to share. Hopefully you’ll see something here that could be translated to suit your own organizational needs. If not, consider it a challenge: Come up with something original and tweet us about it!

5 Organizations With Creative Live Streaming Strategies

1. Corning Museum Of Glass

5 Organizations Doing Live Streaming Right

One of the world’s premier collections of art and historical glass is in New York state, but that doesn’t limit its reach. The museum makes excellent use of live streaming, so if you’re interested in the science and technology behind innovations in glass, you can enjoy much of what the museum has to offer no matter where you live. It airs regularly scheduled live streams of glassmakers at work and archives them for viewing anytime; special museum events are also aired via live stream.

2. Oculus

5 Organizations Doing Live Streaming Right

Virtual reality (VR) company Oculus is no stranger to the idea that VR is a difficult concept for people to understand. You almost have to see it to get it—which is why encouraging users to share live footage of their gameplay is a smart idea. It also raises awareness of VR for consumers. All that on top of the fact that it’s just plain cool to watch your friends battle Wielders live in 1880s London.

Raise the bar on your organization’s live stream with the right live streaming platform—this free guide has everything you need to know before you commit.  

3. T-Mobile

5 Organizations Doing Live Streaming Right

T-Mobile’s unconventional (and America’s “sweariest”) CEO John Legere has embraced live streaming as a way of connecting with his customers. His creative live streams range from rants about the communications industry, to company announcements, to cooking shows (you heard us—the January 15 episode of Slow Cooker Sunday had more than 500,000 views!). I think his live stream strategy is working.

4. GE

5 Organizations Doing Live Streaming Right

What began as an experiment in 2015 returned in 2016 as a proven success: GE’s Drone Week. GE’s work is wide-ranging, which can make it difficult for consumers to relate. The idea behind Drone Week was to make concrete connections between what the company does and how its products impact people’s lives. In 2015, it employed a drone to crisscross the U.S. and capture footage of five remote GE facilities; in summer 2016, the drone flew over dams and other infrastructure facilities in Rio to show GE’s contribution to Olympic facilities there.

5. Wendy’s

5 Organizations Doing Live Streaming Right

Wendy’s partnership with influencer Cody Johns had nearly 300,000 viewers gobbling up a step-by-step demonstration of how to make the chain’s flagship hamburger, the Baconator. Wendy’s ran ads in advance of the live stream, which only lasted six minutes. It worked because it made Cody the center of attention (not the burger), which served to build interest without being overly promotional. (It was also a finalist for a Shorty Award.)

What’s your organization doing with live streaming?

Tweet us @stretchinternet and let us know, and your efforts could be featured in an upcoming article!

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